Native Bee Scene Trail

The West Perth Bee Scene Trail takes visitors around the central village of West Perth. The trail aims to educate visitors about the importance of native bees and how to encourage them into their backyards. The trail is full of sculptures, art murals, bee hotels and wildflower gardens. By scanning a QR code along the trail, you will be taken to the WALN website to find out more about each feature.

Native Bee Mural and Sculpture

Outram Street, near the corner of Hay street

This beautiful mural was created by Laeline Design and showcases some of the amazing bee species we have in Perth and what plants you can plant to bring them into your garden.

The blue banded bee, Amegilla sp., sculpture was made and installed by Respoke and shows how the male bees roost at night by holding onto stems with their mandibles. The sculpture is within a native wildflower garden containing some of the bees favourite flowers like native wisteria (Hardenbergia comptoniana) and emu Bush (Eremophila nivea). There is also a large wooden bee hotel on the wall.

You can pick up a free copy of our native bee fact sheet from BooBook Bottle and Bar just around the Corner on Hay Street.

City of Perth Carpark

25-27  Mayfair Street

The two bee hotels in this Mayfair Street garden depict a Banksia and everlasting flower, which are a favourite among native bees. These hotels have holes ranging from 4mm to 10mm diameter to accommodate a range of cavity nesting bees. They are placed in a spot that receives morning sun and have a roof to protect their cavity entrances from rainfall.

These hotels are not used by the European honeybee but native solitary bees such as leaf cutter bees and resin bees.

Can you see any bees nesting in the bee hotels? 

Stables Bee Hotel

21a Mayfair Street

This bee hotel was designed to model the heritage listed stables behind it. The hotel has jarrah sleepers inside it with hole sizes between 4mm and 8mm diameter. It is important to ensure your use untreated wood for bee hotel cavities. It has been orientated to receive morning sun and afternoon shade which is ideal for nesting bees.

These hotels are not used by the European honeybee but native solitary bees such as leaf cutter bees and resin bees.

Mayfair Flats Bee Hotels

17 – 19 Mayfair Street

The two bee hotels in this Mayfair Street garden depict a gum blossom and Geraldton wax flowers, which are a favourite among native bees. These hotels have holes ranging from 4mm to 10mm diameter to accommodate a range of cavity nesting bees. They are placed in a spot that receives morning sun and have a roof to protect their cavity entrances from rainfall.

These hotels are not used by the European honeybee but native solitary bees such as leaf cutter bees and resin bees.

The hotels have a metal blue banded bee made by Respoke attached to them.

Can you see any bees nesting in the bee hotels? 

Atlas Cafe Window Decals + Bee Hotel

1238 Hay Street

The beautiful decals on the Atlas cafe show two Megachile species of bees among a field of everlastings, Rhodanthe sp., with a Banksia menziesii flower and a Tuart tree canopy.  

If you look carefully you can see a resin bee (Megachile erythropyga) nesting in the hollow of the tree trunk. The female leaf cutter bee (Megachile sp) is collecting pollen for her future offspring using her abdomen hairs.

There is also a female blue banded bee pollinating a fringe lily, Thysanotus multiflorus. Females have four stripes while males have five.

Stop here to view these gorgeous designs and the native bees favourite wildflowers in the planter boxes.  The planter boxes contain native flowers bees love to feed on. Knotted club rush (Ficinia nodosa) was also planted to give the male bees a roosting spot at night. The bee hotel and gumnuts scattered in the planter boxes provide nesting spots for female native bees.

Noongar Boorloo Biodiversity Artwork

Coming Soon!

Teresa Miller’s statement about the proposed Noongar Boorloo Biodiversity artwork: 
I interpret all my commissioned work through a lens of cultural authenticity. I really enjoy sharing Noongar knowledge and traditional story with the broader community. My Whadjuk ancestors always did and still do have a strong connection to that area we now know of as Kings Park. I am a proud descendant of Midgegooroo and his warrior son, Yagan.
 
The old people would meet at this high place for ceremony. It was such a fertile place for hunting and gathering food and bush medicines. It’s also a significant place to us Noongar people because at the base of the hill, that’s where the Wagyl stopped and rested on its journey to and from the sea.
 
To bring plenty of bright colour, intensity and diversity to my painted mural, I plan to focus on the Noongar Season of Kambarang – or Springtime. At this time of the year, the native bees and insects have always been a natural indicator of the local boodja’s health.
 
Kambarang is when many plants and trees are flowering so proudly, so the insects and the native bees are out and about drinking the nectar and spreading the pollen. And of course, the birds and animals are out chasing the insects too, and the Noongar people are hunting the animals and the birds. I want to try and express this ancient spiritual connection between Country, Culture and Community. By focusing on the pollinating native bees and the flowers, I will be telling a bigger story about the sustainable connection that Whadjuk Noongar people enjoy with our Boodja.

West Perth Local

1238 Hay Street

Come and visit the West Perth Local shopfront to see our native bee display showing a range of different wildflowers that native bees like to feed on. We also have example bee hotels and 8 species of native bees on display.  The bees on display are all found in WA and include a:

  • Blue banded bee 
  • Banksia bee
  • Leafcutter bee
  • Lasioglossum bee
  • Resin bee
  • Cuckoo bee
  • Dawson burrowing bee
  • Reed bee